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November 15, 2018

Magnitude: A Bibliography

Posted by Tom Leinster

I’ve just done something I’ve been meaning to do for ages: compiled a bibliography of all the publications on magnitude that I know about. More people have written about it than I’d realized!

This isn’t an exercise in citation-gathering; I’ve only included a paper if magnitude is the central subject or a major theme.

I’ve included works on magnitude of ordinary, un-enriched, categories, in which context magnitude is usually called Euler characteristic. But I haven’t included works on the diversity measures that are closely related to magnitude.

Enjoy! And let me know in the comments if I’ve missed anything.

Posted at 12:31 AM UTC | Permalink | Followups (2)

November 12, 2018

A Well Ordering Is A Consistent Choice Function

Posted by Tom Leinster

Well orderings have slightly perplexed me for a long time, so every now and then I have a go at seeing if I can understand them better. The insight I’m about to explain doesn’t resolve my perplexity, it’s pretty trivial, and I’m sure it’s well known to lots of people. But it does provide a fresh perspective on well orderings, and no one ever taught me it, so I thought I’d jot it down here.

In short: the axiom of choice allows you to choose one element from each nonempty subset of any given set. A well ordering on a set is a way of making such a choice in a consistent way.

Posted at 1:59 AM UTC | Permalink | Followups (19)

November 2, 2018

More Papers on Magnitude

Posted by Simon Willerton

I’ve been distracted by other things for the last few months, but in that time several interesting-looking papers on magnitude (co)homology have appeared on the arXiv. I will just list them here with some vague comments. If anyone (including the author!) would like to write a guest post on any of them then do email me.

For years a standing question was whether magnitude was connected with persistent homology, as both had a similar feel to them. Here Nina relates magnitude homology with persistent homology.

In both mine and Richard’s paper on graphs and Tom Leinster and Mike Shulman’s paper on general enriched categories, it was magnitude homology that was considered. Here Richard introduces the dual theory which he shows has the structure of a non-commutative ring.

I haven’t looked at this yet as I only discovered it last night. However, when I used to think a lot about gerbes and Deligne cohomology I was a fan of Kiyonori Gomi’s work with Yuji Terashima on higher dimensional parallel transport.

This is the write-up of some results he announced in a discussion here at the Café. These results answered questions asked by me and Richard in our original magnitude homology for graphs paper, for instance proving the expression for magnitude homology of cyclic graphs that we’d conjectured and giving pairs of graphs with the same magnitude but different magnitude homology.

Posted at 11:05 AM UTC | Permalink | Followups (1)

November 1, 2018

2-Groups in Condensed Matter Physics

Posted by John Baez

This blog was born in 2006 when a philosopher, a physicist and a mathematician found they shared an interest in categorification — and in particular, categorical groups, also known as 2-groups. So it’s great to see 2-groups showing up in theoretical condensed matter physics. From today’s arXiv papers:

Abstract. Sigma models effectively describe ordered phases of systems with spontaneously broken symmetries. At low energies, field configurations fall into solitonic sectors, which are homotopically distinct classes of maps. Depending on context, these solitons are known as textures or defect sectors. In this paper, we address the problem of enumerating and describing the solitonic sectors of sigma models. We approach this problem via an algebraic topological method – combinatorial homotopy, in which one models both spacetime and the target space with algebraic objects which are higher categorical generalizations of fundamental groups, and then counts the homomorphisms between them. We give a self-contained discussion with plenty of examples and a discussion on how our work fits in with the existing literature on higher groups in physics.

The fun will really start when people actually synthesize materials described by these materials! Condensed matter physicists are doing pretty well at realizing theoretically possible phenomena in the lab, so I’m optimistic. But I don’t think it’s happened yet.

Posted at 5:45 AM UTC | Permalink | Followups (1)