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February 23, 2007

The Health Book

Posted by David Corfield

Well the book — Why Do People Get Ill? — is finally out there in the shops. We had received quite a lot of media attention, so had already got an Amazon.co.uk Sales Rank based on preorders. We’re currently at 78, having fluctuated over the past week, and having reached the dizzy heights of 30 at one point. Do drop by my blog. I’m using it to comment on new findings and to consider points made against the book in reviews. Posted at February 23, 2007 10:12 AM UTC

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Re: The Health Book

That sales rank is amazing! Congratulations!

Posted by: Tom Leinster on February 23, 2007 11:51 AM | Permalink | Reply to this

Re: The Health Book

When will the book arrive Stateside? I’m in New York City, and I’m itching to snap up a copy.

Posted by: Catherine on February 23, 2007 6:52 PM | Permalink | Reply to this

Re: The Health Book

As far as I’m aware the US rights haven’t been bought up yet. Our agents’ webpage confirms this. If you happen to work for a US publishing house,…

Posted by: David Corfield on February 23, 2007 7:09 PM | Permalink | Reply to this

Medicalize Me; Re: The Health Book

I would love to read this book.

Any comments on the below (may be edited down to shorter length, if URL and key quotes are shown):

vhttp://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070223143604.htm

Source: University of Michigan Health System

Medicalize Me: Experts Look At How Our Perceptions Of Illness Are Shaped

Science Daily:
“Medicalize” me: Experts look at how our perceptions of illness are shaped by drug ads, patient empowerment, and more

ANN ARBOR, Mich. – Do prescription drug ads make people think they’re sick when they’re not, or create “disease” out of thin air? Does the “empowered patient” movement mean that doctors have lost some of their professional clout when it comes to making diagnoses and prescribing treatment?

These questions and more are the focus of a set of probing essays in a special section of the Feb. 24 issue of the journal The Lancet, all addressing the topic of “medicalization” and what it means in modern society.

The essays, which grew out of an international workshop…

Posted by: Jonathan Vos Post on February 24, 2007 7:05 PM | Permalink | Reply to this

Re: Medicalize Me; Re: The Health Book

Thanks. I’ll take a look at The Lancet and if I have anything sensible to say will post on the other blog. I can’t expect the other guys to allow this health business to pollute the n-categorical drive to quantum gravity.

Posted by: David Corfield on February 25, 2007 10:17 AM | Permalink | Reply to this

Re: The Health Book

Ordered the book from Amazon. We operate what may be termed a social-medical practice in Northampton, UK and don’t medicalise every issue. I’m looking for ways to assess what we do but not just through standard medical research approaches. Thinking of setting up a community interest company on which pateints sit as well to run the business.

Posted by: Richard Oliver on February 25, 2007 12:33 PM | Permalink | Reply to this

Re: The Health Book

I very much hope you find something useful in the book. If it turns out to be a helpful resource to foster dialogue concerning health care provision, we will be well satisfied.

Posted by: David Corfield on February 25, 2007 1:46 PM | Permalink | Reply to this

Breakfast listening

So there I was, eating my breakfast and minding my own business, radio burbling in the background, when it filters through to my consciousness that the presenter is saying something like “…and psychoanalyst Darian Leader is here to discuss his new book ‘Why Do People Get Ill?’”.

You can hear it too. Leader is last to be interviewed.

(If David won’t blow his own trumpet, I’ll do it for him.)

Posted by: Tom Leinster on February 26, 2007 11:18 AM | Permalink | Reply to this

Re: Breakfast listening

I’m dealing with media attention on this blog.

Now if only I could model the activity of the immune system using directed homotopy.

Actually, if there is a connection between these two areas of research of mine, then it’s narrative, the patient and their narrative, and mathematics as narrative.

Posted by: David Corfield on February 26, 2007 11:42 AM | Permalink | Reply to this

Re: Breakfast listening

OK - I did look on your blog, but couldn’t see it mentioned there. Anyway, I thought the patrons of this cafe might like to listen to it too.

I like Start the Week, but Andrew Marr seemed underprepared this time - he kept getting things wrong about people’s books!

Posted by: Tom Leinster on February 26, 2007 11:50 AM | Permalink | Reply to this

Re: Breakfast listening

I haven’t mentioned this programme yet, as I’m hard at work here in Germany. But I will listen this evening.

It turns out that not every book discussed has been read by all participants, authors and presenter. On the other hand, one person, Darian, had read the other books.

Posted by: David Corfield on February 26, 2007 11:58 AM | Permalink | Reply to this

Re: The Health Book

I see Pegasus have changed ‘ill’ to ‘sick’ and removed ‘do’ from the title, and fashioned a new cover design for the American edition of our book.

Posted by: David Corfield on December 27, 2007 9:50 AM | Permalink | Reply to this

Re: The Health Book

Along with ‘do’, they also removed the question mark, thus changing the entire sense of the title. I guess they figure Americans want answers, not questions!

My condolences.

Posted by: Todd Trimble on December 27, 2007 1:09 PM | Permalink | Reply to this

Re: The Health Book

I guess they figure Americans want answers, not questions!

Good point! I hope we don’t get sued. We often end chapters having raised questions rather than given answers.

And what’s with the US cover image?

It took me a while to grow to enjoy our discordant cover. Perhaps the fact that artist friends were enthusiastic helped. It’s by a Glasgow artist, David Shrigley.

Posted by: David Corfield on December 27, 2007 1:22 PM | Permalink | Reply to this

Re: The Health Book

…to a remarkable extent the norms of our secularized culture not only exclude any serious and systematic questoning of oneself and others about the nature of the human good and the order of things, but they also exclude questioning those dominant cultural norms that make it so difficult to pose these philosophical questions outside academic contexts in any serious and systematic way. We have within our social order few, if any, milieus within which reflective and critical enquiry concerning the central issues of human life can be sustained and the education to which we subject our young is not well-designed to develop the habits of thought necessary for such questioning. This tends to be a culture of answers, not of questions, and those answers, whether secular or religious, liberal or conservative, are generally delivered as thought meant to put an end to questioning. (Alsasdair MacIntyre, The Tasks of Philosophy, pp. 181-2)

Posted by: David Corfield on January 4, 2008 6:30 PM | Permalink | Reply to this

Re: The Health Book

Amazon claims it is available in the US from tomorrow.

Posted by: David Corfield on May 14, 2008 12:59 PM | Permalink | Reply to this

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